María Laetitia Soprano
Acclaim
The maid Susanna (Maria Laetitia, left) and the countess (Brittany Renee Robinson) hatch a scheme in Opera Orlando's production of "The Marriage of Figaro." (Brion Price / Courtesy photo)

But even if Figaro features in the title, his Susanna blazes just as brightly. Soprano Maria Laetitia rules the stage — sometimes literally moving other characters where she wants them. Laetitia always sparkles — dating back to her memorable performance as a saucy maid in Florida Opera Theatre’s 2013 production of “The Old Man and the Thief.” But here she’s positively effervescent. She seems more commanding than ever, and finds a delicate vocal quality for Susanna on moments such as “Who could be as happy as I” that is just heavenly.

Matthew J.Palm

Orlando Sentinel

 

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Matthew J. Palm, Orlando Sentinel
María Laetitia (soprano) as Salud.
Odemaris Ortiz (mezzo-soprano) as La Abuela.

La maravillosa voz de la soprano María Leticia Hernández protagonizó la simple pero efectiva acción dramática en el papel de Salud....

Luis Enrique Juliá

 

 

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Luis Enrique Juliá, El nuevo día
María Laetitia as Salud from the ópera La vida breve of Manuel de Falla.

Es menester aplaudir al elenco de la versión de concierto de “La Vida Breve”. Impecables de principio a fin.

“Salud”, la soprano María Leticia Hernández, estremeció el alma con la angustia articulada en su registro y en su rostro. Encarnada en el texto, ni pudo contener las lágrimas en un rol extraordinario de grata recordación y que despierta el interés de apreciar su talento con mayor regularidad.

Jaime Torres Torres

Para Fundación Nacional para la Cultura Popular

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Jaime Torres Torres, Fundación Nacional para la Cultura Popular

“Puerto Rican soprano Maria Laetitia sparkled with the exuberance of singing songs from her homeland.”

 

 

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Matthew Palm, Orlando Sentinel
Courtesy of Seepalmas.com

Maria Leticia Hernández (Maria Laetitia) captivated the audience with her feminine coquetry and her spotless voice...

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Lissette Rosado, SeePalmas.com
César Méndez, Tatiana Irizarry, Maria Laetitia y Rafy Davila.

Maria Leticia Hernández no solo tiene una hermosa voz, como demostró en La petenera de la zarzuela La Marchenera de Moreno Torroba, sino también una encantadora gracia y picardía perfectas para un personaje como el de Luisa en el romance Las Carceleras de Las hijas de Zebedeo. Su manejo de los melismas gitanos fue excepcional... La química entre Dávila y María Leticia Hernández en Cállate corazón de Luisa Fernanda fue sensacional. Y muy divertido el dúo de Irizarry y Hernández en Aquí estoy ya vestida de El barberillo de Lavapiés.

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Luis Hernández Mergal, El Nuevo Dia
"But it's Maria Leticia Hernadez who drives this endeavor. Eyes flashing as Laetitia, she schemes and dreams with gusto, breaking into a million-watt smile and hitting high notes with equal aplomb. Although Laetitia reveals her true colors early on, Hernandez's determination is so infectious, you can't help but root for her. That's just human nature." Read More...
Matthew J. Palm, Orlando Sentinel Entertainment Critic, Orlando Sentinel
Adlan Cruz, María Leticia Hernández and Roselín Pabon.
The Concert proceeded from Cuba to the deep South with one of the most beloved lullabies of all times, “Summertime.” The work, from Gershwin’s jazz-inspired opera “Porgy and Bess,” was delivered by a new young face on the Puerto Rico lyric theater scene, 26-year-old Maríá Leticia Hernández. With her carefully studied Afro-American southern drawl already indicated by the composer in the lyric, she combines the genres of opera, yet nuanced instrument- putting baby to sleep, but certainly not her audience.

Hernández was in her element with the three songs in this segment, communicating the pathos and the naked feline/feminine truth of the lyrics of “Memory” from “Cats”, and the untethered joy of “I Could Have Danced all Night” (Note the past tense, program writers and careful singers). The broad British “ah” in “dance(d)” was deliciously delivered, as was the rest of the lyric, and the whirling around of a beautiful young lady with an imaginary partner was inspired. Beautiful job.

“I Dreamed a Dream” from “Les Miz” was another right-on hit from a young performer who already makes all the right moves to relate to her audienc, including the clutching of the heart/breast. She was stunning in first a black gown, and then a red one, with a train to match her verve and even folksy style of Pabón (conductor), which his audience seems to favor. Her asmirers bombarded her with bouquets... A great show. Read More...
Peggy Ann Bliss, The Star

The three ladies were quite proficient, and good actresses as well: Rebecca Krynski as Fiordiligi, Kate McNamara as Dorabella, and María Leticia Hernández as Despina. Krynski had a warm, stylish voice that could soar with a creaminess - an unexpected feature at such a young age. McNamara acted humorously; Ms Hernández, too, was extremely funny especially when playing Despina disguised as the doctor and the notary.

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Richard Traubner, MusicalCriticism.com

If anyone could be said to "steal the show," in such a talented cast, it would be Maria Leticia Hernandez, as Despina, the ladies' maid. She sang her two arias most winningly, with a natural comedic flair. She was also called on to impersonate the "doctor," and the "notary," and this she did very exaggeratedly, and with great aplomb.

Berta Calechman, Berta Calechman

...in the meantime, is not entirely approving of the relationship his son has developed with Rosa Gonzales (another great performance here by Maria Leticia Hernandez).

-Daniel Coombs for Audiophile Audition (web magazine for music, audio & home theater).

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Daniel Coombs, Audiophile Audition (web magazine for music).

María Leticia Hernández as the sensual young Rosa, whom young John almost marries, and Chris Lucier as Roger, Alma’s decent childhood friend, were other standouts.

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By ANTHONY TOMMASINI, New York Times

Claire Coolen stole the show as the wacky mom, since soprano Maria Leticia Hernandez and director Dona D. Vaughn tactfully avoided presenting Rosa as a clichéd spitfire.

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James Jorden, New York Post

Auden Farmer and María Leticia Hernández brought lively stage presences to the roles of the other women in John's life.

-Opera News

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Opera News
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